Marketing yourself? Get ink and get out.

get ink get outSerious about landing writing opportunities and freelance gigs? Looking to make your emails more eye-catching? Memorize the following mantra: Get ink and get out!

Why? Let me explain.

I spend much of my full-time job writing, editing, and analyzing marketing emails. Often these emails are crafted for Fortune 500 companies, spreading awareness about their tech products (you might even be reading these very words on one.) After getting up-close-and-personal with hundreds of these emails covering countless topics and audiences, I’ve noticed a crucial commonality that always makes them better: cutting to the chase.

With so much yadda yadda yadda filling up our inboxes, it’s crucial to narrow messaging to key points that stand out. There’s enough bland content in the world. When you really need to capture attention, it’s often best to get ink, and get out of there.

I use this philosophy when pitching ideas to editors or applying for freelance opportunities. This very week I reached out to a respected national brand calling for humorous women-friendly content. Although I don’t recommend such a playful approach every time, I showed I knew their audience. I sent the following email:

Greetings,

My name is Crystalee Beck and I’m responding to your call for freelance writers.

If I could, I’d put on a party dress, bring the kazoos and balloons to your office, all while holding my handmade sign: PICK ME, PICK ME!

Then again, I guess that’s what cover letters and resumes are for. (See attached.)

Let’s party, yeah?

I’ll bring the confetti,


Crystalee Beck
Freelance Writer & Managing Editor
delightedtowrite.com

And guess what? Apparently they like kazoos too. Although they had hundreds of interested candidates, their reply appeared in my inbox two days later, with a contract for me to sign.

Your turn: How do you make your message stand out in the inbox?

 


4 Comments


  1. Although brevity is the key, humor or talking about how their publication has impacted my writing or that I’m an avid reader is also helpful. The other part about standing out is most folks send out their queries and when they don’t hear from them, they give up. I almost always send a *very* brief (we’re talking one sentence) follow-up e-mail no sooner than two weeks after the initial e-mail.

    • Thanks for your insights, Willi. Great point about following up. It’s easy to think that if we haven’t heard back, we were rejected…but then again, perhaps they were busy that week? Or on vacation? Your one-liner approach never hurts.

  2. Wow, I really like your approach! It just screams personality, creativity, humor, and everything else!

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